- 2010 HSC Question Workshop

‘An individual’s interaction with others and the world around them can enrich or limit their experience of belonging.’
Discuss this view with detailed reference to your prescribed text and ONE other related text of your own choosing.
STEP ONE:
  • Interaction?
  • Enrich?
  • Limit?
  • Experience?
Notes from the Marking Centre:

In stronger responses, candidates engaged in a perceptive manner with the view expressed in the statement, establishing an insightful thesis, which was sustained throughout the response through a discerning selection of textual detail and an astute analysis of both the prescribed text and the text of their own choosing. The skilful integration of the analysis of both texts into the conceptual framework of their response was a distinguishing feature of highly developed responses. These responses were also marked by clear and purposeful control of language, with a judicious use of related material.

Some candidates found it difficult to sustain their argument as their chosen related material offered them limited opportunity to develop a strong argument or detailed analysis to support their ideas on the nature of belonging.

Raimond Gaita, Romulus My Father

In stronger responses, candidates engaged confidently with the statement. These responses developed an insightful discussion of the familial interactions between Romulus, Raimond and Christine within the broader context of their migrant experience. Many developed their argument through consideration of the limitations that mental illness can have on an individual’s sense of self, and the consequent isolation from others and their community.

Belonging as a result of cultural interaction or prejudice was also a central focus, and many candidates incorporated an insightful discussion of the differing impacts of the migrant experience on the two generations. This was often integrated with a reflection on Raimond’s strong bond to the physical environment in contrast to Christine’s complete alienation and Romulus’ forced connection. Ultimately, Romulus’ capacity to belong as a result of his transcendent sense of a ‘common humanity’ was explored within the strongest responses. These responses were discerning in their selection of textual detail, demonstrating a holistic understanding of the text.

In weaker responses, candidates focused more literally on simplistic ideas about relationships between characters and their affiliation with their physical and social environments, identifying the consequences of these relationships as either enrichment or limitation. These responses tended to be narrower in focus, limited to just one aspect of the text, such as Romulus and the landscape, or Christine’s isolation. These responses often relied on retelling the story and where textual features were identified, they were often not explained or connected to the concept or the statement.
STEP TWO Points to explore:

  • Discuss the familial interactions between Romulus, Raimond and Christine within the broader context of their migrant experience.
  • Consider the limitations that mental illness can have on an individual’s sense of self, and the consequent isolation from others and their community.
  • Look at Belonging as a result of cultural interaction or prejudice: discuss the differing impacts of the migrant experience on the two generations. Eg: reflect on Raimond’s strong bond to the physical environment in contrast to Christine’s complete alienation and Romulus’ forced connection.
  • Explore Romulus’ capacity to belong as a result of his transcendent sense of a ‘common humanity’

TASK:

  1. Post the best Introduction in your group below
  2. Include three topic sentences you will use to argue the thesis presented in the introduction
  3. Before you post anything, make sure all sentences are grammatically sound. Please ensure you break down any convoluted sentences back to their simplest form (simple sentences) and reconstruct appropriately.

5 thoughts on “- 2010 HSC Question Workshop

  1. 1. An individual’s interaction with others and the world around them can enrich or limit their experience of belonging
    Discuss this view with detailed reference to your prescribed text and ONE other related text of your own choosing.

    Belonging is more than a state, it is a dynamic process which is affected by the individuals personal circumstances and the relationship they have with others around them. It incorporates the larger social circumstances which determine the course of action taken by the individual. A true sense of belonging can be found in different circumstances for different people, due to the complex nature of the concept. Through the exploration and interpretation of Raimond Gaita’s memoir Romulus, My Father, a vast array of representations of belonging present within the text is discovered. This ext involves various techniques that assist in portraying the concept of belonging to both an environment and to relationships.

  2. An individual’s social interactions with their external environment actively enables them to enrich their sense of belonging. This is evident in Gaita’s biographical memoir Romulus, My Father as it divulges the transitory nature of his migrant experience to Australian life. All occurring whilst his father endures a disassociation with the Australian landscape due to retained cultural ties. Correspondingly, Justin Lin’s, Fast and The Furious: Tokyo Drift demonstrates a keen insight on divergent cultural backgrounds and lifestyles that is transcended by the sole appreciation of car racing. The ability of protagonists within both texts to interact with, and embrace their newfound social paradigms; ultimately determines the extent to which they experience a sense of belonging.

  3. It is the degree of connection to our surrounding community that dictates our experience on belonging and furthermore our perception on life and it’s purposes. Exposure to new and different places is able to evoke either a connection of lack of affiliation with the community. The memoir Romulus my Father (RMF) written by Raimond Gaita explores the ways different personalities are able to adapt to a new environment and feel a sense of affiliation. Similarly, the poem ‘Island Man’ by Grace Nichols outlines the psychological battle an immigrant encompasses in moving to England from his native Caribbean. These texts provide personalities that derive their perception on belonging through their interaction with the world.

  4. Belonging is a fundamental aspect of human nature, which can offer individuals a sense of identity, security and connectedness. Experiences of belonging are closely related to one’s interaction with others, as positive experiences can enrich their sense of belonging, while negative experiences can limit it. An individual’s limited experience of belonging through their inability to interact with the world around them can often incite them to reject society’s values through acts of self-alienation, rebellion and defiance. This is evident in the memoir Romulus, My Father written by Raimond Gaita through the representation of the difficult life Romulus and his family experienced after moving to Australia. Similarly, My Sister’s Keeper, a film directed by Nick Cassavetes explores the conflicted character Anna who faces varying situations that challenge her ability to interact with the world around her.

  5. 2010: ‘An individual’s interaction with others and the world around them can enrich or limit their experience of belonging.’
    Belonging is represented as an evolved necessity; a requirement that individuals attain which allows one to develop connections with others as well as the wider world around them. The limit or enrichment of belonging evolves from the continual ability for individuals to reconcile identity within the bounds of their external social paradigm. Raimond Gaita’s biographical memoir, ‘Romulus, My Father’ (RMF), focuses on how the lack of social identification and resulting personal conflict is attributed to the protagonist’s divergent morality. Further, the film ‘Rise of the Planet of the Apes’ (RPA) by Rupert Wyatt, is a story told through the life of a chimpanzee named Caesar who proves to the viewer that a sense of affiliation to people and places is affected through the maturity of the mind as a direct implication of the passage of time and by those who share similar qualities and characteristics. Ultimately, these texts portray the way in which a sense of belonging can be enriched or limited through the passage of time and the way in which individuals are able to connect with people and places.

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